The missing statues that expose the truth about Confederate monuments

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There’s a certain symmetry to the debate over Civil War iconography: When a Confederate monument falls, Confederate apologists rise up.

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This time, they’re angered by the toppling of a statue honoring the common Confederate soldier at the University of North Carolina, known locally as Silent Sam. In defense of the statue, they’ve drawn on a time-honored set of arguments. Slavery was never central to the Civil War, they insist, and regardless, the Confederate everyman at UNC had no direct relation to the South’s peculiar institution. Instead, Silent Sam and similar monuments across the country are simply tributes to the valor and sacrifice of Confederate soldiers.

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‘ Good Tuesday morning from T-Town ‘ Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where I'm visiting nephew Anders, starting his sophomore year at Alabama.

With China’s economy cooling,’President Trump and his aides are emboldened on the hardline tariffs strategy that they increasingly believe is jamming President Xi Jinping, officials tell Jonathan Swan and me.

Cont.

A member of Congress who recently spoke at length with Trump about trade said: "He thinks he’s right and he thinks he’s winning."

The member of Congress said: "They think internally that because China sells so much more to the U.S. than the U.S. sells to China, this is a war they can win."

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For people of Charlottesville, a long year of reckoning

Reconciliation is a process, not a switch to be thrown. But Charlottesville, like the nation, shows that exposing the roots of a divide is a healthy starting point. Last in a series of profiles of individuals whose lives were changed by Charlottesville.

Further on.

The best seats are already taken half an hour before the Charlottesville City Council is due to start.

When Ms. Walker walks in, the crowd claps and cheers. There are scattered boos and hisses when she is followed by her predecessor and fellow city councilmember Mike Signer, who was mayor during last year’s protests and the consequent fallout.

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  • Date: 2018-08-10T15:42-05
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For people of Charlottesville, a year of reckoning

When Ms. Walker walks in, the crowd claps and cheers. There are scattered boos and hisses when she is followed by her predecessor and fellow city councilmember Mike Signer, who stepped down after being widely criticized for his management of last year’s protests and the consequent fallout.

By the time the meeting kicks off with the Pledge of Allegiance, the room is packed. As everyone says, ‘ liberty and justice for all,’ someone says loudly, ‘All?’

Over the next five hours, residents step up to confront the city council and new police chief, RaShall Brackney, the first African-American woman appointed to the job, with questions about the coming weekend. It’s clear there’s a lot that hasn’t been resolved since last year, especially around accountability.

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What Charlottesville Changed

A year later, we’ve asked some of the most thoughtful people we know’from historians to a former CIA director to researchers of extremism’to put this shocking moment in context: What did Charlottesville change? Was it a moment of reckoning for our society? Did it fracture the movement known as the ‘alt-right,’ or did it strengthen it? As new crowds of white supremacists descend on Washington and other U.S. cities this weekend, and as invigorated counterprotesters come to meet them, here’s what they had to say.

Cont.

‘Where America still sees Nazis and flaming torches, I see the first stirrings of the thing that comes after.’Dahlia Lithwick is the senior legal correspondent for Slate.

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