The most expensive properties, Park Place and Boardwalk, are marked in dark blue.

[ The Secret History of Segregation on Your Monopoly Board ]
T ake a good look at a Monopoly board. The most expensive properties, Park Place and Boardwalk, are marked in dark blue. Maybe you’ve drawn a card inviting you to ‘take a walk on the Boardwalk.

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Take a good look at a Monopoly board. The most expensive properties, Park Place and Boardwalk, are marked in dark blue. Maybe you’ve drawn a card inviting you to ‘take a walk on the Boardwalk.’ But that invitation wasn’t open to everyone when the game first took on its current form. Even though Black citizens comprised roughly a quarter of Atlantic City’s overall population at the time, the famed Boardwalk and its adjacent beaches were segregated.

Jesse Raiford, a realtor in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in the early 1930s and a fan of what players then called ‘the monopoly game,’ affixed prices to the properties on his board to reflect the actual real-estate hierarchy at the time. And in Atlantic City, as in so much of the rest of the United States, that hierarchy reflects a bitter legacy of racism and residential segregation.

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Publisher: The Atlantic
Date: 2021-02-21T11:15:00Z
Author: Mary Pilon
Twitter: @theatlantic
Reference: Visit Source (Read Article)

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